Why we needed #metoo

Why we needed metoo Taylor Blake FlickrTree woman. Source – flickr

Recently a friend said to me that she didn’t think so many of those using the metoo hashtag needed to kick up too much of a fuss. Most of them were probably only verbally sexualised on the street, was her theory. Maybe it was just people making a fuss about nothing, right?

The thing is, if you’ve never experienced sexual violence of any kind, you are the lucky ones. That’s not to say this is a bad thing. We want more and more ‘lucky’ young women, and the #metoo movement isn’t just about making people lucky- it’s about making being safe the norm, for everybody.

As someone who has been attacked, I couldn’t find the words to say, ‘no, it IS needed.’ Because still the shame runs deep through my veins. So I decided to write this post instead.

If someone slaps a woman’s ass on the street, it’s no big deal, right? I mean, it’s not rape. It’s not murder. My issue with this attitude is this – one disrespectful act can lead to another.

I know not everything in life needs to be taken seriously, but when one of our sisters or brothers speaks out against injustice, especially when it is so hard to break this silence , we need to accept their reality as truth. And to listen.

#Metoo was a huge deal for those that were brave enough to speak out. And denying the fact that it ever happened is simply denying a larger problem, and that needs to be addressed.

beth budestheim painting

Connected woman. Source: bethbudeshiem.com

We cannot keep raping our mother. Sexual violence is the worst kind of violence because it is a misuse of sacred feminine energy, it is a misuse of love. And it is a deep hurt, sadness and longing, for real love.

The reason we need this truth, is for unity, for all those who are grieving their pain, together. And for an awareness, that voices will be raised, and this is acceptable, no more. No more. No more.

Oprah. Source – the Tube

In response to… me too

me too heartMe too. Source: all express

Well, this is an idea I had about two years ago. I’m glad someone else got there and made it happen.

I think the idea of sharing our stories of sexual pain or attack as women (and men, actually) can be majorly healing. I believe that shedding light on the dark corners of our human experience always helps encourage healing; helps us connect as human beings. We are all having difficulties and challenges with similar things throughoutour journeys on this tumbledown earth.

Like many, I have been assaulted. The #everydaysexism is something so common, it is unfortunately expected as a given if you are a woman. When talking of assault, the idea that you might be upset or want to express feelings of grief for the violence, is often frowned upon.

Feminists are mocked for being possible rape victims with a chip on their shoulder. The thing is, is this not a valid thing to be upset about? Hundreds of women (…or is it thousands by now?) are able to say that it is.

I find the idea of sharing a scary one. Many may feel their privacy needs to be kept intact and sharing is not for them. This I totally respect, of course.

But for me, the values of Lana Wachowski ring in my ears as I see the feed on my facebook wall fill with a chiming solidarity between my sisters, as they vulnerably speak their truths.

But, as Lana says:

‘Sacrifice of my private civic life 

shall have value…’

in-response-to-hairy-armpits-world-in-hands-inner-michaelWorld is in our hands. Source:

And so, here it is, my vulnerable, very human, expression of solidarity to my sisters and brothers: me too.